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Being born safe: new maternity clinic opened in Central African Republic

LAST SPRING, MANY OF YOU HELPED US BUILD A NEW MATERNITY HOSPITAL IN BANGUI

We want to express our deepest gratitude for your participation in the 20K. Your support was essential in reaching our goal of raising funds for the new maternity ward in Bangui.

THANKS TO YOUR SUPPORT, MSF IS FACILITATING ACCESS TO CARE FOR EXPECTANT MOTHERS WITH THE CONSTRUCTION OF A MATERNITY WARD IN BANGUI

We have been active in Central Africa since 1997 and built our first maternity unit in 2014: the Castors Maternity.

Since then, bed occupancy has continuously increased to reach 135% in 2019, highlighting the need to build a new maternity unit.

Thanks to your support, the CHUC's maternity and Neonatology wards have been completely renovated by MSF. Since July 2022, we have been providing emergency care to pregnant women and newborns in critical situations.

From mid-July to mid-December, MSF and Ministry of Health teams treated:

  • 2,546 pregnant women,
  • 669 babies were admitted to the neonatal unit, including 125 premature babies.

Few hospitals in the country offer a similar service, including an intensive care unit for premature babies and newborns with breathing difficulties and other complications.

The critical maternal and child health situation in the Central African Republic has prompted MSF to provide free maternity care to women and newborns in several locations around the country. MSF also trains Ministry of Health staff and renovates and provides medical facilities with a good level of care.

MSF nurse Virginie Abdouramane (right) walks with a patient in the maternity ward of the Community Hospital Centre (CHUC), supported by MSF. Community Hospital Centre (CHUC), Bangui, Central African Republic, October 24, 2022 - ©MSF
MSF nurse Virginie Abdouramane (right) walks with a patient in the maternity ward of the Community Hospital Centre (CHUC), supported by MSF. Community Hospital Centre (CHUC), Bangui, Central African Republic, October 24, 2022 - ©MSF

CONTEXT IN THE CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC

Decades of instability and armed violence in the Central African Republic (CAR) have contributed to essential medical care being out of reach for many pregnant women and newborns. Overshadowed by the country's ongoing security situation, addressing this daily emergency is a priority for Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) teams. Medical assistance - before, during and after childbirth - is essential to preserve the health of women and newborns. Pregnant women are particularly vulnerable to the lack of access to health care.

Ebokossi Benicia, 15, with her first child born prematurely at 36 weeks gestation and suffering from respiratory problems. The child is cared for at the intensive care unit of the MSF-supported neonatal emergency department, Centre Hospitalier Communautaire (CHUC), Bangui, Central African Republic, October 24, 2022 - ©MSF
Ebokossi Benicia, 15, with her first child born prematurely at 36 weeks gestation and suffering from respiratory problems. The child is cared for at the intensive care unit of the MSF-supported neonatal emergency department, Centre Hospitalier Communautaire (CHUC), Bangui, Central African Republic, October 24, 2022 - ©MSF

15 GYNECOLOGISTS FOR 6 MILLION PEOPLE

"Being born or giving birth in CAR is a risk," explains Professor Norbert Richard Ngbale, obstetrician and gynecologist in the maternity and neonatology department at CHUC. "There are only about 15 gynecologists in the country, for a population of six millions. There is a huge lack of qualified personnel, especially in rural areas, where you usually have traditional birth attendants who are not trained to detect complications."

Stephanie Kamangomda with her son Archange, born prematurely at 28 weeks and who spent 45 days in the intensive care unit at CHUC. The medical teams nicknamed Archange "the general" because of his fighting spirit.
Stephanie Kamangomda with her son Archange, born prematurely at 28 weeks and who spent 45 days in the intensive care unit at CHUC. The medical teams nicknamed Archange "the general" because of his fighting spirit.
MSF-supported neonatal unit, Centre hospitalier communautaire (CHUC), Bangui, Central African Republic, Oct. 24, 2022. - MSF

Once again, thank you for your support and commitment to this important cause. Your participation in the 20K not only helped improve the health of women and children in Bangui, but also showed your commitment to improving health care for all.

We hope to see you again this year!